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How to Buy a Triathlon Wetsuit

   January 27th, 2016   Posted In: How-To   Tags:

How to Buy a Triathlon Wetsuit

Want to know how to buy a triathlon wetsuit? It’s important to remember that a triathlon wetsuit is different than the usual wetsuit. Triathletes know that surf and SCUBA diving wetsuits just don’t cut it for competitive swimming.

Triathlon wetsuits are made out of super buoyant neoprene panels that actually help you float in the water. Tri suits also feature a slick skin exterior that allows you to glide through the water without any friction.

These specialized wetsuits are also cut differently to minimize restriction. The legs are cut above the calf, armpits are wider, and necklines are specially designed to provide the ultimate range of motion. Lastly, all triathlon wetsuits are made out of high grade stretch neoprene to ensure a glove like fit. Are you ready to buy a triathlon wetsuit? Let’s get started!

Triathlon wetsuits are available in Full or Long John styles.

buy a triathlon wetsuit

Fullsuits are warmer and more buoyant, for water temperatures below 60 degrees (depending on your tolerance for cold). Since there is more rubber in a fullsuit, it floats more. If you’re balanced and higher in the water you’ll swim faster. Additionally, fullsuits let less water in at the seals, which reduces weight and drag.

Long Johns or Janes are sleeveless wetsuits designed for water 60 degrees and up. The main advantage of a long john is increased flexibility and mobility due to the sleeveless design. Long John wetsuits also are easier to remove during the transition to your bike.

You also want to consider buoyancy and inner linings when choosing a triathlon wetsuit!

1- Buoyancy Factor:

This is a snapshot of how the wetsuit floats in the water. Adding more buoyancy to the suit makes your swim easier and more efficient.

Good: Buoyancy panel is located on chest
Better: Panel extends from chest to thighs
Best: Panel covers chest to ankles for maximum buoyancy

2- Inner Lining:

The inner lining -or- jersey of a wetsuit directly impacts the flexibility and stretchiness of a wetsuit. More stretch equals more flexibility.

2 Way Stretch: Super stretch material that is twice as stretchy as standard wetsuit neoprene
4 Way Stretch: Super stretch material that is 4 times as stretchy as standard wetsuit neoprene
6 Way Stretch: Super stretch material that is 6 times as stretchy as standard wetsuit neoprene

Please Be Aware.. These feature packed wetsuits cannot be used for any other sporting activities except swimming. The coated neoprene is delicate and will easily puncture if diving or surfing.

Check out our entire selection of triathlon wetsuits! Want to know more about triathlon wetsuits? Watch the video below!

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Lauren Belt

Merchandiser at Wetsuit Wearhouse
Lauren (LoLo) has been picking out the latest and greatest wetsuits and being the social media queen for Wetsuit Wearhouse since 2014. She learned to surf for the first time ever in Costa Rica but she gravitates more towards SUP. When she's not scouring the web for travel deals, you can find her either hiking, running, practicing yoga, studying holistic nutrition or reading a good book outside on a beautiful day.
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24 Comments

  • Hello! I live in the far corner of the Pacific Northwest and want to start swimming in the Ocean. I am 5’2″ and very petite. 32″ bust 24″ waist. I want buoyancy but I don’t sense I need the top of the food chain as I want to watch my budget and will likely want to also buy a surf suit. I know they are different. I wonder if a surf suit would be ok for both. I don’t plan on professionally swimming and I am not doing triathlons. I am just getting out into the water to survive the grey winters and get a good workout. Any suggestions?

  • Avatar John Sheahan says:

    I’ve been an open water swimmer for several years now. I own a full triathlon style wetsuit and a sleeveless. I use them to swim in Lake Ontario a lot, but I also swim without rubber in August and September. I’d like to really extend my season. Does anyone make a wetsuit for open water swimming in the really cold temperatures? Like 33 to 40 degrees F?
    Thanx in advance

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