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Top 5 Ways You Can Travel With a Surfboard

   December 5th, 2018   Posted In: Articles   Tags:

Top 5 Ways You Can Travel With a Surfboard

One of the hardest parts of being a surfing enthusiast is traveling with your surfboard.

It can be difficult to figure out the right airline to go through. Or what kind of public transit you can use once you arrive at your favorite surfing destination. Even knowing how to pack and transport your board can be difficult.

Luckily we have a few tips and tricks that will get you on the road and out into the waves.

Pack That Board up Right

surfboard

Surfboard travel bag. Image courtesy of The Inertia.

The first thing you must always focus on is how to pack your board. No matter how you’re traveling it’s important to keep your board safe and wrapped. This will keep it from getting damaged during your trip. It will also keep others around you safe.

If you are thinking about flying, consider wrapping the piece in bubble wrap, towels or even articles of clothing that you don’t mind getting dirty. Then, it might be a good idea to invest in a surfboard travel bag.

If you’re traveling with a group, consider stacking your boards in your bag. This will help keep them contained. Travel bags are great for car trips as well. So make sure you check them out.

Pay Attention to Airline Fees

Flying with surfboards can be expensive. Many airlines do not have set fees for boards. When planning your trip, make sure you compare costs of each airline. Many of them will cycle through costs so a company you’ve used in the past may not have the same cost.

Be prepared for a hefty fee, no matter what airline you choose.

Public Transit Etiquette with Your Surfboard

For many surf enthusiasts, navigating public transit with your surfboard is a pretty standard thing. Luckily, in coastal cities, transit companies are prepared for this. There may be storage options available to you on subways or buses. It’s always important to know what size of board is allowed on a train or bus though. Many transit companies will limit length.

Four-six feet seems to be the standard. If you have a board with you on a train or bus that does not seem to have a storage option, be sure to keep your board out of the way. This will help your fellow passengers navigate the aisles easily.

Road Tripping with Your Board

surfboard

Road trip with your surfboard just like this!

For many, loading up into a car and making a cross country trek to the coast is the ultimate road trip fantasy.

But before you load up your friends and your boards make sure you know how to pack your boards. If you have multiple boards, invest in some EVA foam floor mats from your local hardware store. Sandwiching these foam mats between your boards will keep them from denting each other.

It’s also a good idea to make sure you have a luggage rack already installed on the top of your car. This will allow you to tie down the boards and keep them stable as you’re traveling.

Hitting the Road with Your Board: It Isn’t Hard

Traveling with your surfboard doesn’t have to be a bureaucratic nightmare. With an investment in a travel bag, some savvy price shopping and a fair knowledge of the transit rules, you’ll be able to get anywhere with your board.

If you would like some more advice on surfing and how to travel with your board, explore our blog!

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Chris Moleskie

Chris "Mole" Moleskie is the Founder, President, and CEO of Wetsuit Wearhouse. Mole grew up in the water on the East Coast. After graduating from Salisbury University, on Maryland's Eastern Shore, he headed to San Diego to find the eternal Ocean City. Wetsuit Wearhouse was formed a few years later in 2001. He swims, surfs when he can, SCUBA dives, wakeboards, SUPs, snowboards 15-20 days a season, and recently fell in lust with wakesurfing. Mole spends his summers at the not so secret Wetsuit Wearehouse Testing Facility on the Potomac River.
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